4

Emergency Numbers

111 – The non-emergency medical number

This is available nationwide and replaces and expandes on the former
NHS Direct service. Use this for illnesses and minor injuries where life
isn’t threatened, but you would like some advice on what to do next.
Calls are free.

999 – The main emergency number

This is the emergency number for police, ambulance, fire brigade,
coastguard, cliff rescue, mountain rescue, cave rescue, etc. Note the
important word ‘EMERGENCY’. This number should be used only when
urgent attendance by the emergency services is required – for example
someone is seriously ill or injured, or a crime is in progress.
Calls are free, and 999 can be dialled from a locked mobile phone.

101 – The non-emergency number for the police

This number will put you through to the police.
You should call 101 to report a crime and other concerns that do not
require an emergency response. For example if your car is stolen or
your property has been damaged.

112 – Mobile emergency number

This operates exactly the same as 999 and directs you to exactly the
same emergency call centre. The important thing about 112 is that it
will work on a mobile phone anywhere in the world. So on your next
foreign holiday, you don’t need to make a note of the emergency
number for the country you visit; you just need 112. Incidentally, a EU
requirement is that emergency call centres must provide a translations
service. Calls are free and 112 can also be dialled from locked mobile
phone.

0800 111 999 – The emergency Gas Services

This number will put you through to the emergency Gas Services.
Call this number if you think there is a dangerous gas leak nearby.

S

ect

ion 1

C

ommunit

y S

uppor

t

Is

s

u

e

 0

1

 :

 0

3

 Fe

b

 2

0

1

7